Come discover the scenic walking trails of Campbell Valley Regional Park. Located in Langley, these Metro Vancouver trails wind through the natural beauty of serene, mossy wooded forests, wetlands and farmlands.

There are 29 kms of easy trails to enjoy any time of the year that are family and dog friendly and also 14 kms for horse riding trails. The Shaggy Mane trail is a dual purpose trail and walkers must yield to riders.

There are 29 kms of trails to enjoy in the wooded forest and marshlands of Campbell Valley Regional Park located in Langley, Metro Vancouver

There are 29 kms of trails to enjoy in the wooded forest and marshlands of Campbell Valley Regional Park, located in Langley, Metro Vancouver. Photo credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

Top things to do in Campbell Valley Park

  • Explore the trails of Campbell Valley. Download a Campbell Valley Park trail map. Guided tours are sometimes available from the Information Centre. The trails are family and dog friendly.

A little girl explores on a walk in the marshy woodlands of Campbell Valley Regional Park in Metro Vancouver.

A little girl explores during a walk in the marshy woodlands of Campbell Valley Regional Park in Metro Vancouver. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

There are 29 kms of trails to enjoy in the wooded forest and marshlands of Campbell Valley Regional Park located in Langley, Metro Vancouver

Marshlands of Campbell Valley Regional Park located in Langley, Metro Vancouver. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

  • Learn about the history of the area by wandering around the heritage Annand-Rowlatt farmstead and the one-room school house.

The Annand-Rowlatt Farmstead 1886
The historic Annand-Rowlatt farm is located near the South Valley entrance. The land was first settled by Alexander Joseph Annand, after he arrived from Nova Scotia in 1886. The land was later settled by dairy farmer Len Rowlatt in 1914. Rowlatt was also a water diviner. The original house was built in 1886 and replaced by a larger home in 1888. This larger home is the oldest house in Langley. Find out more about the history of this heritage farm and the Langley pioneers.

The Annand-Rowlatt Farmstead 1886 This historic farm is located in Metro Vancouver’s Campbell Valley Regional Park, Langley First settled by Nova Scotian Alexander Joseph Annand in 1886 and later by dairy farmer Len Rowlatt in 1914. Rowlatt was also a water diviner.

The historic Annand-Rowlatt Farmstead is located in Metro Vancouver’s Campbell Valley Regional Park, Langley. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

The Lochiel Schoolhouse
Built in 1924, the one-room Lochiel Schoolhouse moved to Campbell River Park in 1988 to complement the other historic buildings. The school house operated until 1975. View photos and read more about the school from the Langley Centennial Museum.
  • Visit the Nature House located in the red barn on the heritage homestead. Here you will find lots of activities offered for all age groups. Check out the living pond, the bobcats and owls. Nearby at the other barn on the property, take time to look at the old farm equipment.
The Annand-Rowlatt Farmstead 1886 This historic farm is located in Metro Vancouver’s Campbell Valley Regional Park, Langley First settled by Nova Scotian Alexander Joseph Annand in 1886 and later by dairy farmer Len Rowlatt in 1914. Rowlatt was also a water diviner.

The Annand-Rowlatt Farmstead barn is now the Nature House. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

  • Check out the various types of mosses along the trails. There are numerous mosses found in British Columbia, however a study needs be done under a microscope to completely identify each species. For complete information and images read Common Mosses of British Columbia.

“British Columbia possesses the richest diversity of any political division in Canada. It is also greater than the combined bryoflora of all of the United States west of the Rocky Mountains. “ – E-Flora BC the Electronic Atlas of the Flora of British Columbia.

Moss grows on the trees along a hiking trail in Campbell Valley Rgional Park in Metro Vancouver. There are a variety of mosses, lichens and leafy liverworts found in Pacific Northwest forests.

Moss grows on the trees along a hiking trail in Campbell Valley Regional Park in Metro Vancouver. There are a variety of mosses, lichens and leafy liverworts found in Pacific Northwest forests. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

Moss and lichen found on a tree branch on the hiking trails of Campbell Valley Rgional Park in Metro Vancouver. There are a variety of mosses, lichens and leafy liverworts found in the Pacific Northwest forests.

Moss and lichen found on a tree branch on the hiking trails of Campbell Valley Regional Park in Metro Vancouver. There are a variety of mosses, lichens and leafy liverworts found in the Pacific Northwest forests. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

  • Look for wildlife along the trails. The day we went, we came across squirrels and chipmunks.

Frisky Douglas squirrel
The Douglas squirrel lives on the coast regions of southern BC, Washington, Oregon and northern California. The Douglas squirrel is much smaller than the larger Eastern grey squirrels found in the city of Vancouver. This squirrel is also known as a chickaree or pine squirrel. These animals belong to the rodent family and like to eat pine seeds, berries, mushrooms, acorns and fruit.

The Douglas squirrel lives on the coast regions of southern BC, Washington, Oregon and northern California. The Douglas squirrel is much smaller than the larger Eastern grey squirrels found in the city of Vancouver. This squirrel is also known as a chickaree or pine squirrel. These animals belong to the rodent family and like to eat pine seeds, berries, mushrooms, acorns and fruit. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

The Douglas squirrel lives on the coast regions of southern BC, Washington, Oregon and northern California. The Douglas squirrel is much smaller than the larger Eastern grey squirrels found in the city of Vancouver.  Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

Playful Red-Tailed Chipmunks
The Red-Tailed Chipmunk is one of five types of chipmunk species found in Canada. These chipmunks can be found in wooded areas of British Columbia and Alberta in Canada, and Washington, Montana and Idaho in the US. These animals belong to the rodent family and like to eat seeds, berries, grasses and fruit.

The Red-Tailed Chipmunk is one of five types of species found in Canada. These chipmunks can be found in wooded areas of British Columbia and Alberta in Canada; and Washington, Montana and Idaho in the US.These animals belong to the rodent family and like to eat seeds, berries, grasses and fruit. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

The Red-Tailed Chipmunk is one of five types of chipmunk species found in Canada. These chipmunks can be found in wooded areas of British Columbia. Photo Credit: Wendy Nordvik-Carr

  • Visit the historic Langley Speedway. Racing began at this popular stock car speedway in 1963. During its time, three NASCAR races were held here. The track closed in 1988.
  • Enjoy a quiet picnic
  • Plan a group function in one of the areas of the park, including a group campsite for 40 and a picnic site for 75.
  • Attend an event in the park. In September check out the Country Fall Fair celebration and Farmers Market. Find a complete calendar of Langley activities here.

Scenic walking trails of Campbell Valley Regional Park

  • Shaggy Mane Trail – 11 kms for horses and others to share. Horses have priority.
  • Revine Loop – 1.8 km
  • Little River Loop – 2.2 km, wheelchair accessible
  • Perimeter Trail – 3.7 km, wheelchair accessible
  • South Valley Trail
  • Deer Trail
  • Vine Maple Trail

Getting There:

Take Highway 1 from Vancouver or any other area of Metro Vancouver then take the 200th Street exit heading south.

There are three entrances that have parking, washrooms, picnicking and park information nearby:

  • South Valley entrance off 200th Street and 8th Avenue also has a group picnic site, drinking water, easy access to the Nature House and Annand-Rowlatt Farmstead.
  • North Valley entrance off 200th and 16th Avenue.
  • Campbell Downs Equestrian Centre off 208th Street, first entrance past 16th Avenue provides easy access to the historic Langley Speedway, Little River Bowl, activity area and horse trailer parking.

Quick Facts:

  • 29 kms of easy family-friendly trails.
  • 14 kms of horse riding trails.
  • Signs are posted indicating the on-leash and leash-optional dog areas.
  • A section of National Hiking Trail goes through the park. The National Hiking Trail was created to become a footpath across Canada.
  • The Annand family is credited with establishing the Langley Fall Fair.
  • The Annand-Rowlatt Farmstead home built in 1888 is the oldest house in Langley.

Be Prepared:

  • Do not leave valuables in your vehicle. Break-ins do happen in the parking areas.
  • Keep safe and do not hike alone after the park is closed.
  • Always let others know your plans to hike.
  • Do not wander off the trails.
  • Do not feed the animals.
  • Check here for a safety guide for regional parks.
  • There is no smoking in the park except in the designated areas.

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